FOOD AND ECONOMY IN KENYA

FOOD AND ECONOMY IN KENYAFOOD AND ECONOMY IN KENYAFOOD AND ECONOMY IN KENYAFOOD AND ECONOMY IN KENYAFOOD AND ECONOMY IN KENYAFOOD AND ECONOMY IN KENYA
FOOD AND ECONOMY IN KENYAFOOD AND ECONOMY IN KENYAFOOD AND ECONOMY IN KENYAFOOD AND ECONOMY IN KENYAFOOD AND ECONOMY IN KENYAFOOD AND ECONOMY IN KENYA

FOOD AND ECONOMY IN KENYA, AFRICA
 

FOOD IN DAILY LIFE

Corn (or maize) is the staple food of Kenyans. It is ground into flour and prepared as a porridge called posho, which is sometimes mixed with mashed beans, potatoes, and vegetables, to make a dish called irio. Another popular meal is a beef stew called ugali. This is eaten from a big pot, and each diner takes a piece of ugali, which he or she uses as a spoon to pick up beans and other vegetables. Boiled greens, called mboga, are a common side dish. Banana porridge, called matoke, is another common dish. Meat is expensive, and is rarely eaten. Herders depend on milk as their primary food, and fish is popular on the coast and around Lake Victoria. Mombasa is known for its Indian foods brought by the numerous immigrants from the subcontinent, including curries, samosas, and chapatti, a fried bread. Snacks include corn on the cob, mandazi (fried dough), potato chips, and peanuts.

Tea mixed with milk and sugar is a common drink. Palm wine is another popular libation, especially in Mombasa. Beer is ubiquitous, most of it produced locally by the Kenyan Breweries. One special type of brew, made with honey, is called uki.


FOOD CUSTOMS AT CEREMONIAL OCCASIONS IN KENYA

For special occasions, it is customary to kill and roast a goat. Other meats, including sheep and cow, are also served at celebrations. The special dish is called nyama choma, which translates as "burnt meat."


BASIC ECONOMY IN KENYA

Kenya's economy has suffered from inefficiency and government corruption. The tourist industry has also been harmed by political violence in the late 1990s. Seventy-five to 80 percent of the workforce is in agriculture. Most of these workers are subsistence farmers, whose main crops are corn, millet, sweet potatoes, and such fruits as bananas, oranges, and mangoes. The main cash crops are tea and coffee, which are grown on large plantations. The international market for these products tends to fluctuate widely from year to year, contributing to Kenya's economic instability.

Many Kenyans work in what is called the jua kali sector, doing day labor in such fields as mechanics, small crafts, and construction. Others are employed in industry, services, and government, but the country has an extremely high unemployment rate, estimated at 50 percent.


LAND TENURE AND PROPERTY IN KENYA

During colonial rule, Kenyan farmers who worked the British plantations were forced to cultivate the least productive lands for their own subsistence. After independence, many of the large colonial land holdings were divided among Kenyans into small farms known as shambas. The government continues to control a large part of the economy, although in the late 1990s it began selling off many state farms to private owners and corporations.


ARTICLE COURTESY OF EVERYCULTURE.COM

FOOD AND ECONOMY IN KENYAFOOD AND ECONOMY IN KENYAFOOD AND ECONOMY IN KENYAFOOD AND ECONOMY IN KENYAFOOD AND ECONOMY IN KENYA